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Voices of Experience: A Conversation with Former Treasury Under Secretaries for International Affairs

There is no more valuable time than now, in the early days of the new administration, for a bipartisan exchange among leaders of previous administrationson the formulation and execution of the international economic policies. Join CGD for a conversation with three former Treasury Under Secretaries for International Affairs who played central roles in the Bush II and Obama administrations. The panel discusses the outlook for the global economy, international structural changes and challenges that have emerged since their time in office, the critical issues that will confront the next Under Secretary for International Affairs, and the nature of the job and lessons learned. This event marks the launch of the US Development Policy Initiative’s Voices of Experience series, which will feature discussions with senior officials from past administrations of both parties who shaped international development, economic, and financial policy.

The Conservative Case for OPIC: Harnessing the Private Sector for Development

With cuts to foreign aid on the horizon, the United States, now more than ever, needs to sharpen its tools to operate in a constrained budget environment. Key to this approach is a strong development finance institution that can leverage private investment to achieve development outcomes, as well as create opportunity for American companies abroad—all at less than no cost to the US taxpayer. At this event, Congressman Ted Yoho of Florida addresses the vital role the Overseas Private Investment Corporation plays in US development policy, and discusses how he came to support its mission. An expert panel discusses the conservative rationale behind OPIC, why its critics are wrong, and what can be done to strengthen the institution and leave it better prepared to address future development challenges.

Preventing the Next Pandemic: Opportunities and Challenges

An infectious disease outbreak anywhere on earth poses a direct threat to Americans. On airplanes, trains, and ships—and via migratory birds or insects that cannot be constrained by borders—pathogens can easily travel around the world, reaching a network of major cities in as little as 36 hours. Keeping Americans safe from the pandemic threat will require U.S. action and leadership both at home and abroad. A diverse panel of experts discusses the scale and scope of pandemic risk; the economic and security rationale for investment in pandemic preparedness; and opportunities to strengthen America’s ability to prevent and respond to the next pandemic.

Young Professionals and the Future of Global Development

Today’s newest recruits will determine tomorrow’s development agenda—and in this highly interactive, first-of-its-kind event, CGD research assistants and communications staff invite other young professionals and students to consider the future of global development.

What will international development look like in 20 years? What challenges will command our attention as leaders in the field? And how will we respond to, or rebuild, the fraying political consensus around development cooperation?

Payouts for Perils: Using Insurance to Radically Improve Emergency Aid

Emergencies cause poverty, drive displacement, and exacerbate insecurity. Aid to tackle natural disasters is generous, but mainly arrives when needs are acute rather than when it would do most good. Responding effectively is hard because budgets are uncertain and funding gets promised but not delivered. Please join us for the launch of a new CGD report Payouts for Perils: Using Insurance to Radically Improve Emergency Aid setting out how we can use the principles and practice of insurance to save lives, money and time when catastrophes strike.

Financing for Learning: Making Global Education a Reality

Building on the momentum of last year’s report of the International Commission on Financing Global Education Opportunity, chaired by former UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown, and the launch of the Education Cannot Wait Fund, incubated at UNICEF, to address learning needs in humanitarian emergencies, this event discusses how current investment can be leveraged and increased to ensure that every child can access their right to a quality education.

Addressing the Global Refugee Crisis: How We Can Bridge the Gap Between Humanitarian Response and Development Assistance

Of the 21 million refugees around the world today, low- and middle-income countries host more than 80 percent. The strain of refugee flows can threaten stability in these countries, with regional and global consequences. But this is an eminently manageable challenge for the international community. A new report, the culmination of a joint CGD-IRC study group on forced displacement and development, suggests compacts—agreements between host countries and humanitarian and development actors—are a uniquely well-suited approach to address the refugee crisis. Join us for a discussion on how host countries, humanitarian and development agencies, the private sector, and civil society can forge new and stronger partnerships to better meet the needs of refugees and the communities where they seek refuge.

The Global Refugee Crisis in Urban Settings: Improving Self-reliance and Reducing Aid Dependence

More than 21 million people around the world are living as refugees. Three-quarters of those do not live in refugee camps, but in urban communities, profoundly altering the social fabric of cities in major host countries. Currently their survival depends on both regular outside assistance from humanitarian agencies and host country governments, and their own support structures such as social network ties. With the average duration of refugee status now more than ten years, this is often an unsustainable solution. Please join the Center for Global Development, in collaboration with the Urban Institute, as we explore how urban refugees can play a greater role in local economies, become more self-reliant and less dependent on outside assistance. What might help them integrate more with host communities? What is the role of social and economic networks?

Latin American Policy Options for Times of Protectionism

A protectionist stance from the US looms large as a policy concern for Latin America, where many countries have chosen a growth model based on increased integration with the rest of the world. What should Latin America’s response be? What are the alternative forms of trade integration and markets creation that the region should explore? What is the role for monetary, fiscal and financial policies? What are the mistakes of the past to be avoided? These are among the key and timely issues that the Latin American Committee on Macroeconomics and Financial Issues (CLAAF) will address. 

The Challenge and Logic of Greater Financing for Africa

At this special event ahead of the World Bank/IMF Spring Meetings, AfDB president Dr Akinwumi Adesina will give keynote remarks and then join an eminent panel to consider the AfDB's future opportunities and challenges. 

Financing the Future: A Conversation with Mark Suzman

In the current political and economic climate, donor governments are under pressure to reduce and spend foreign aid budgets as efficiently and effectively as possible. Aid remains a critical driver of progress. Yet at the same time, aid is increasingly NOT how the world pays for development; even the annual total of around $160 billion in overseas development assistance (ODA) represents a small and declining share of all global development finance. Private investment flows and developing countries' own public resources dwarf ODA. And while organizations like the World Bank and the UN still have top billing, commitment to their core missions appears to be weakening and regional alternatives are on the rise. Given these considerations, what is the future of development finance?

A New Approach to Development Finance

The world’s development challenges are far too vast for the old way of doing things. To generate the trillions of dollars necessary to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, international institutions, policymakers and the private sector need a new approach that unlocks the power of private investment.  IFC Executive Vice President and CEO Philippe Le Houérou will address how his institution’s new strategy of “creating markets,” especially where they are weak or nonexistent, can help redefine development finance in an uncertain global economic environment. Following Le Houérou’s remarks, he will be joined by a stellar panel for a discussion of the private sector development agenda.

Implementing Ownership at USAID and MCC: A US Agency-Level Perspective

Hear policymakers from inside and outside the US government discuss their experience applying the principle of country ownership, reflecting on its importance as well as its challenges and trade-offs. Forthcoming research from CGD’s US Development Policy Initiative will review progress made in implementing country ownership, identify the constraints the agencies face, and offer recommendations for better execution of a country ownership approach in practice.

15 Years of Leadership: A Tribute to Nancy Birdsall

Nancy Birdsall will step down as CGD president at the end of December 2016, having led the organization for its first 15 years. In this video, some recent visitors to CGD pay tribute to Nancy's many accomplishments.

Shared Harvest

What if development cooperation didn't have to mean charity? CGD's Michael Clemens saw a way to help Haiti recover from the 2010 earthquake and benefit the US economy at the same time. Learn more.

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