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CGD in the News

August 27, 2018

An ‘indefensible’ decision: not vaccinating pregnant and lactating women in an Ebola outbreak (STAT News)

By Ruth Faden, Ruth Karron, and Carleigh Krubiner

Days after the Democratic Republic of the Congo declared an end to a deadly Ebola outbreak in the western province of Équateur, a new one emerged in North Kivu province. With the number of cases and death toll rising rapidly, the country’s ministry of health, the World Health Organization, and partners are working to launch a rapid and effective response that includes the use of an experimental vaccine. But their decision not to vaccinate women who are pregnant or lactating unfairly deprives them of the protection they deserve against this deadly disease.

The latest outbreak is due to the Zaire strain of the Ebola virus, a highly lethal variant that was responsible for more than 11,000 deaths in the 2013-2016 epidemic in West Africa and which killed 60 percent of those infected in the recent initial DRC outbreak. The new Ebola eruption has the potential to be even more lethal, as the North Kivu Province is the site of an ongoing armed conflict that makes medical treatment far more difficult to provide.

Fortunately, an experimental vaccine called rVSV-ZEBOV has been shown to be highly effective against this strain of Ebola virus. The DRC’s ministry of health, along with WHO and partners, has already begun employing the vaccine using the highly successful ring vaccination strategy, in which contacts and contacts-of-contacts of people with Ebola are offered the vaccine to halt the spread of the disease. 

Read the full article here

 

August 27, 2018

Africa at risk: Malaysia slams China’s “new version of colonialism” (CAJ News Africa)

By Said Aboubaker and Savious Kwinika 

It is a crisis mirrored across the developing world: loans so huge that government struggles to repay the debt.

But Malaysian prime minister Mahathir Mohamad would not have it.

On a visit to Beijing this week, he accused his host of luring nations into a trap with easy loans for projects they don’t need.

... 

According to a report from the Centre for Global Development, the country most at risk is Djibouti, an enclave that controls one of the world’s busiest shipping lanes from the Indian Ocean to Suez. 

Read the full article here

August 27, 2018

Food Supply Chains, Decent Work and Sustainable Agriculture (SDG Knowledge Hub)

By Adam Fishman 

Story Highlights: 

The Boston Consulting Group published a brief on drivers of food waste and initiatives companies can take to tackle them, while 'It’s Fresh!' launched a food waste calculator aimed at consumers.  Greenpeace launched two reports on sustainable seafood and human rights abuses in the seafood industry; the 2018 Global Slavery Index examined fishing and cocoa industries.  The Center for Global Development released a paper on voluntary sustainability standards for coffee, and institutional investors called for strengthened standards on palm oil. 

Read the full article here.

August 27, 2018

As Ebola cases hit 111, DRC responders address local concerns (University of Minnesota CIDRAP)

By Lisa Schnirring

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) health ministry reported eight more lab-confirmed Ebola cases over the past 4 days, along with another probable infection, all from areas that have already reported illnesses.

In other outbreak developments, outbreak coordinators held a public meeting in Beni to ease tensions following recent community protests against the response, and health teams closed and disinfected a clinic in Beni that recently reported three cases. Another health ministry report said two patients who were given the experimental treatment mAb114 have recovered from their infections.

Also, a group of experts wrote in a Stat commentary that pregnant and lactating women should be included in vaccination efforts. 

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Push for vaccinating pregnant women

In a commentary in Stat today, three US health experts wrote that the decision by outbreak responders not to immunize pregnant and lactating women with the experimental Ebola vaccine unfairly deprives them of protection against the deadly disease.

The authors are Ruth Faden, PhD, MPH, founder of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, Ruth Karron, MD, director the Center for Immunization Research and the Johns Hopkins Vaccine Initiative, and Carleigh Krubiner, PhD, a policy fellow at the Center for Global Development. All are part of the Pregnancy Research Ethics for Vaccines, Epidemics, and New Technologies (PREVENT) international working group. 

Read the full article here.

August 26, 2018

Africa at risk: Malaysia slams China’s “new version of colonialism” (CAJ News Africa)

By Said Aboubaker and Savious Kwinika 

It is a crisis mirrored across the developing world: loans so huge that government struggles to repay the debt.

But Malaysian prime minister Mahathir Mohamad would not have it.

On a visit to Beijing this week, he accused his host of luring nations into a trap with easy loans for projects they don’t need.

... 

According to a report from the Centre for Global Development, the country most at risk is Djibouti, an enclave that controls one of the world’s busiest shipping lanes from the Indian Ocean to Suez. 

Read the full article here.

August 26, 2018

Todd Moss interview on Newsday (BBC)

In this episode, Todd Moss speaks on the inauguration of the President of Zimbabwe and the overall subsequent effects of the elections on the country’s economy. 

Listen here.

August 26, 2018

Todd Moss interview on Newsday (BBC)

*Jump to 27:00 for Todd’s interview*

In this episode, Todd Moss speaks on the inauguration of the President of Zimbabwe and the overall subsequent effects of the elections on the country’s economy.

Listen here.

August 25, 2018

India is Evolving from Being a ‘Recipient’ to a ‘Donor’ (The Policy Times)

By Nandika Chand 

India is one of the youngest and fastest emerging economies in the world. Over the years, the nation has evolved and continues to do so politically, diplomatically and digitally as well as through policies. In the last thirty years, India has emerged from a ‘recipient’ of foreign aid to a ‘donor’. India is a nation, walking that fine line between being a ‘developing’ and ‘developed’ country.

According to an article by the Centre for Global Development, India Emerges as an Aid Donor, “India has quietly transitioned to a donor country, emerging on the world stage as a significant provider of development assistance.”

Read the full article here.

August 23, 2018

Is the global education sector heading toward fragmentation? (Devex)

By Sophie Edwards 

LONDON — The global education sector, long neglected according to some experts, could be set for transformation with the emergence of a string of new funds and financing instruments launching this year. But while the funds have the potential to channel much-needed money into learning, some development experts are asking whether their sudden proliferation risks fragmenting the sector, or duplicating efforts. 

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Yasmine Sherif, executive director of ECW, agreed: “We don’t look at fragmentation, we look at comparative advantage … [Each organization] needs to focus on what it’s good [at] and work together.”

She also pointed out that the yawning funding gap for education makes it unlikely that proliferation or duplication is the problem.

“I can say with absolute conviction the challenge is not that we’re duplicating each other, the challenge is we’re not doing enough,” she said, adding that the global education sector should learn from other sectors, including global health and climate change, which have multiple players and funds.

But others aren’t so sure. Owen Barder, vice president at the Center for Global Development, said that in general there is “excessive proliferation … and insufficient consolidation” in the development space, particularly when it comes to health and education. 

Read the full article here.

 

August 22, 2018

The United States should push for a genuine democratic transition in Zimbabwe (Washington Post)

By Todd Moss, Michelle Gavin, Alexander Noyes 

Michelle Gavin, formerly President Barack Obama’s senior Africa director at the National Security Council and U.S. ambassador to Botswana, is senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. Todd Moss, formerly deputy assistant secretary of state for Africa, is a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development. Alexander Noyes is a senior associate at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. The authors were part of a preelection assessment mission to Zimbabwe. 

For Zimbabwe’s long-ruling party, the July 30 election was intended to legitimize President Emmerson Mnangagwa, ushering in a new era of global investment into a perilously fragile economy. In the wake of a deeply flawed contest, whether that effort is successful might rest with the international community. While Mnangagwa and his challenger Nelson Chamisa are currently battling in court over the final results, a debate is underway in Washington over how to respond. 

Regardless of the court ruling, the verdict is already in: Mnangagwa is no reformer and no longer deserves any benefit of the doubt. Instead, the preelection environment, the management of the vote, and the post-election violence all show why Washington must maintain pressure for a truly democratic transition. 

Read the full article here.

 

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